Tag Archives: SVX

Emission Testing State Subaru

 Emission Testing Subaru:

Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer, nor should a state I/M program inspector or its contractors install the FWD fuse in the engine compartment. Attempting to do so will result in uncontrolled vehicle movement and may cause an accident or injuries to persons nearby.

State Emission Testing Subaru: Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer
State Emission Testing Subaru: Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer.

Resultant vehicle damage due to improper testing is not covered under the SUBARU Limited Warranty and is the responsibility of the state I/M Program or its contractors or licensees.

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to implement programs to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. Certain states are required to adopt either a “basic” or “enhanced” vehicle Inspection/Maintenance (l/M) Program, depending on the severity of their air pollution problem.

The ‘enhanced’ I/M emission testing simulates actual driving conditions on a dynamometer and permits more accurate measurement of tailpipe emissions than the ‘basic’ I/M test, which measures emissions only during engine operating conditions at idle and 2500 RPM. The ‘enhanced’ l/M test also includes a pressure check to identify evaporative emissions leaks in the fuel system.

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Brake Fluid Flush Subaru:

Brake Fluid Flush Subaru:

This is a step by step guide on how to do a brake fluid flush on most Subaru cars. It’s often a good idea to do a brake fluid flush at least once a year to keep your Subaru’s braking system in good condition. This is even more important if you autocross or do track days with your car. Use a good performance brake fluid and not whatever is cheapest at Autozone. I have a strong preference towards ATE and Motul brake fluid. Good fluid combined with good brake pads like a Hawks or Carbotechs will give your Subaru great stopping power.

1.) Either jack-up the vehicle and place a rigid rack under it, or lift-up the vehicle.

2.) Remove all the wheels.

3.) Drain the brake fluid from master cylinder.

4.) Refill the reservoir tank with recommended brake fluid.

NOTE:

• Avoid mixing different brands of brake fluid to prevent degrading the quality of fluid.
• Be careful not to allow dirt or dust to get into the reservoir tank.
Air bleeding sequence (1) → (2) → (3) → (4)

Brake Fluid Flush Subaru: Air bleeding sequence (1) → (2) → (3) → (4)
Brake Fluid Flush Subaru: Air bleeding sequence (1) → (2) → (3) → (4)

5.) Install one end of a vinyl tube onto the air bleeder and insert the other end of the tube into a container to collect the brake fluid.

Brake Fluid Flush Subaru: Install one end of a vinyl tube onto the air bleeder and insert the other end of the tube into a container to collect the brake fluid.
Brake Fluid Flush Subaru: Install one end of a vinyl tube onto the air bleeder and insert the other end of the tube into a container to collect the brake fluid.

 

NOTE: 
• Cover the bleeder with cloth, when loosening it, to prevent brake fluid from being splashed over surrounding parts.
• During the bleeding operation, keep the brake reservoir tank filled with brake fluid to eliminate entry of air.
• The brake pedal operation must be very slow.
• For convenience and safety, two people should do the work.
• The amount of brake fluid required is approx. 500
m2 (16.9 US fl oz, 17.6 Imp fl oz) for total brake
system.

6.) Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly two or three times and then hold it depressed.

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OBD-II Subaru Diagnostic Systems

OBD-II Subaru Diagnostic Systems:

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now has regulations in place that establish requirements for on-board diagnostic (OBD-II) systems on light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks. The purpose of the OBD-II system is to ensure proper emission control system operation for the vehicle’s lifetime by monitoring emission-related components and systems for deterioration and malfunction.

OBD-II Subaru Diagnostic Systems: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now has regulations in place that establish requirements for on-board diagnostic (OBD-II) systems on light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks.
OBD-II Subaru Diagnostic Systems:
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now has regulations in place that establish requirements for on-board diagnostic (OBD-II) systems on light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks.

There’s a big difference between detecting only hard faults (OBD-I) and having the ability to actively monitor the system for proper operation, deterioration or a malfunction (OBD-II).

Engines in today’s vehicles are largely electronically controlled. Sensors and actuators sense the operation of specific components (e.g., the oxygen sensor) and actuate others (e.g., the fuel injectors) to maintain optimal engine control. An on-board computer, known as the “powertrain control module,” controls all of these systems.

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SVX POWER STEERING SYSTEMS PART 4

SVX Power Steering Systems on Early Subarus Part 4:

There are two model-specific systems available on SVX vehicles:

SVX Power Steering Systems on Early Subarus Part 4: The engine speed sensitive, or conventional belt driven hydraulic pump and pinion type steering system is standard equipment on the SVX.
SVX Power Steering Systems on Early Subarus Part 4: The engine speed sensitive, or conventional belt driven hydraulic pump and pinion type steering system is standard equipment on the SVX.

• The engine speed sensitive, or conventional belt driven hydraulic pump and pinion type steering system is standard equipment on the SVX.

• An SVX equipped with the SVX Touring Package uses an optional vehicle speed-sensitive system. This system provides normal power assist at low vehicle speeds for reduced driver steering effort, and reduced steering assist at increased vehicle speeds for increased road feel and improved engine operating efficiency. Both systems have many similarities with the Legacy system.

SVX Power Steering Pump

Both systems share many similarities to existing Subaru steering systems. Both use a belt driven power steering pump, although the pump housings are different in appearance.

Rack

A conventional power assisted rack with the standard Subaru lines and hoses is used by the standard system.

Oil Cooler

An oil cooler pipe has been added to both SVX systems. It is located in front of the radiator on the return side of the system.

Rubber Coupler

A steering shaft rubber coupler is used by both SVX systems to reduce road noise and vibration.

SVX Power Steering Pressure Switch

A power steering pressure switch is located on the outlet side of the pump. The switch monitors increased engine load during idle speed steering. The switch provides an input to the MPFI ECU, which prevents stalling by raising the engine idle speed. There is not an additional trouble code for the MPFI ECU.

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POWER STEERING SYSTEMS ON EARLY SUBARUS PART 3

POWER STEERING SYSTEMS ON EARLY SUBARUS PART 3

Cybrid Power Steering

The Cybrid Power Steering System was standard equipment on the XT6. It’s a computer controlled,
electric motor-driven hydraulic steering system, using a power-assisted rack and pinion assembly similar to the XT. This system provides improved steering feel and more precise power assist over a wider operating range. Fuel consumption is reduced because it requires less horsepower due to the electrically-driven hydraulic pump. The specific system used on the XT6 is quicker than other XT power steering systems, with just 3.2 turns lock-to-lock.

POWER STEERING SYSTEMS ON EARLY SUBARUS PART 3: The Legacy RS used in rallying used the early Subaru power steering system.
POWER STEERING SYSTEMS ON EARLY SUBARUS PART 3: The Legacy RS used in rallying used the early Subaru power steering system.

Cybrid Steering Components

The Cybrid Power Steering System consists of four major components:

• The Motor and Pump assembly mounted on the front bulkhead (firewall).
• A Steering Sensor located inside the vehicle at the base of the steering column.
• A Signal Controller located in the left rear quarter panel.
• The Power Controller mounted on the front bulkhead (firewall) to the left of the Motor/Pump assembly.

Motor/Pump Assembly

The Motor/Pump assembly is similar to a starter motor, since it has an armature, fields, and brushes which are serviceable. The electric motor drives a pump which is very similar in design to an engine driven pump. This combination replaces the familiar belt driven P/S pump assembly. The Cybrid System requires special hydraulic fluid to retain stable viscosity during cold temperatures.

Heater

The Pump incorporates an electric heater to warm the hydraulic fluid in extremely cold operating conditions, improving the steering performance. A thermistor type switch located on a bracket above the Motor/Pump assembly, senses the underhood (ambient) temperature and sends an input to the Signal Controller.

The Heater operates for approximately five minutes after engine start-up. The Signal Controller grounds the heater relay, which passes battery voltage to the heater. The heater relay is located near the motor/ pump assembly.

Note: The Heater only works when the thermometer signals an extreme cold condition.

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Power Steering Systems On Early Subarus Part 2

Power Steering Systems On Early Subarus Part 2:

Power Steering Rack System

Subaru’s power steering system contains a pump, hydraulic line, and a gearbox (rack). The hydraulic pump is a vane-type pump driven by the engine. It provides pressurized fluid for the system.

Power Steering Systems On Early Subarus Part 2: Subaru’s power steering system contains a pump, hydraulic line, and a gearbox (rack). The hydraulic pump is a vane-type pump driven by the engine. It provides pressurized fluid for the system.
Power Steering Systems On Early Subarus Part 2: Subaru’s power steering system contains a pump, hydraulic line, and a gearbox (rack). The hydraulic pump is a vane-type pump driven by the engine. It provides pressurized fluid for the system.

Oil Pump Operation

The pump has two internal valves: a flow control valve and a relief valve. The flow control valve regulates the volume of power steering fluid delivered to the rack. During high engine rpm, the pressure in the pump overcomes the flow control valve spring. The control valve slides back to close off an oil passage to the rack and to open an oil return port to the pump inlet. This reduces the power assist to the rack during high speeds, improving the steering wheel feel and response.

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Steering Systems on early Subarus Part 1

Steering Systems on early Subarus Part 1:

Rack And Pinion Steering Mechanism

Subaru steering systems utilize a rack and pinion steering mechanism. As the pinion gear rotates, the rack moves left or right. Rack and pinion steering gives the driver precise control over the wheels. The simple, compact design is easy to service.

Steering Systems on early Subarus Part 1: The Subaru SVX used Subaru's early power steering system.
Steering Systems on early Subarus Part 1: The Subaru SVX used Subaru’s early power steering system.

CGR – VGR Ratios

Two manual steering racks are used in Subaru vehicles: a constant gear ratio (CGR) rack and a variable gear ratio (VGR) rack. The teeth on the CGR rack are equally spaced so the turning effort is equal throughout the turning range. The teeth on the VGR rack are spaced closer together on the ends of the rack than in the middle. The turning effort decreases as the turning angle increases so sharp-radius turns are easier to make.

Legacy and SVX Steering Racks

Several different power steering racks have been installed in Subaru vehicles. The racks used in the L-series, XT, Legacy and SVX vehicles are similar. All have a one-piece gearbox and lack the external air vent distribution tube found on the rack in pre-’85 and carryover vehicles. However, the XT rack differs from the L-series rack in several ways.

The XT rack is made of aluminum and has a different control valve. Different types of hydraulic seals are used in the two racks, and each has its own unique special service tool. The power steering rack in the pre-’85 model year vehicles and the Brat has a two-piece gearbox and an air vent distribution tube. It also has seals, service procedures and special service tools that differ from the other racks.

Rigid Steering Column

Three types of steering columns are used in Subaru vehicles: a rigid steering column, a tilt steering column and the XT and SVX tilt and telescoping steering column. The rigid steering column is found on L-series DL models, the Legacy standard model, and Justy vehicles. The rigid steering shaft does not tilt or pop-up, but is collapsible (a safety feature). The shaft is connected to the gearbox by universal joints.

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