Tag Archives: AWD

Subaru Picture of the day!

AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.
AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

Subaru Cold Weather And Driveability

Subaru Cold Weather And Driveability:

The Winter season brings cold weather to many parts of the country, and with it the traditional driveability problems.

Subaru Cold Weather And Driveability: The Winter season brings cold weather to many parts of the country, and with it the traditional driveability problems.
Subaru Cold Weather And Driveability: The Winter season brings cold weather to many parts of the country, and with it the traditional driveability problems.

Before you push the panic button on Subaru cold weather and driveability problems, remember:

• No vehicle runs as well when it is cold as it does when it is at normal operating temperature.

• You have been operating the vehicle in more moderate temperatures and has gotten accustomed to the way it has been running. Now it is colder and things are not working the same.

• Some areas of the country may be using gasoline blended for warmer temperatures. These fuels normally do not atomize as well in cooler temperatures.

• Oxygenated and reformulated fuels that are in use in many parts of the country are normally harder to ignite in cold cylinders.

• Many drivers get their gas at one station because it may be close to home or work. Question them about this and if this is true, suggest they try a different brand of gas. It may take a couple tanks before any improvement is noticed. Different manufacturers blend their fuels differently.

• The 4EAT has a temperature sensor in the ATF and the Transmission Control Unit (TCU) will not allow an up-shift into 4th gear until the ATF has reached a specific temperature. This 4EAT design characteristic may be interpreted as a driveability problem by a driver who is not familiar with 4EAT operation.

There are many reasons for Subaru cold weather and driveability issues during cooler weather. Spending a few minutes with your Subaru and look over the points listed above should eliminate misconceptions about the Subaru cold weather performance and driveability characteristics of Subaru vehicles.

 

LSD Mechanical DCCD Advantage Explained:

LSD Mechanical DCCD Advantage Explained:

LSD: Advantages of mechanical LSD

The mechanical LSD mechanism is advantageous in that it has good response of the LSD differential limiting force to the engine driving force and has direct vehicle operational stability allowing the driver to easily grasp changes in the vehicle behavior. This post discusses these advantages in comparison with conventional DCCD system.

LSD Mechanical Advantage: Controlling coil current based on driving force estimated from detected information. Time lag existent between a change in engine driving force and generation of LSD differential limiting force.
LSD Mechanical Advantage: Controlling coil current based on driving
force estimated from detected information.

LSD Advantage: The LSD differential limiting force exactly follows changes in the engine driving force.
LSD Mechanical Advantage: The LSD differential limiting force exactly
follows changes in the engine driving force.

DCCD Subaru STi Explained

DCCD Subaru STi Explained:

The Driver’s Control Center Differential system is system that appropriately controls the differential limiting force of center differential LSD depending on running conditions of a vehicle. The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.

The system consists of a center differential of planetary gear type provided with LSD function, a steering angle sensor, a yaw rate sensor, a lateral G sensor, a DCCD control module and other components.

DCCD: The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.
DCCD: The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.

Hybrid LSD mechanism using conventional electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism added with torque-sensitive mechanical LSD mechanism allows approximate coincidence between the vehicle acceleration/deceleration and LSD clutch differential limiting timings, resulting in linear LSD characteristics acquired through driver’s accelerator operation. Thus, the driver can more freely control the vehicle by easily grasping behavior of the vehicle.

In addition, the steering angle sensor let the DCCD control module know the driver’s intension of turning. In combination with the yaw rate and lateral G sensors, it adjusts the electromagnetic clutch LSD differential limiting force based on the running path imaged by the driver and the actual behavior of the vehicle. Thus, cornering in better accordance with the driver’s image is enabled, preventing occurrence of understeer and oversteer.

LSD MECHANICAL DCCD ADVANTAGE EXPLAINED

For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.

 

DCCD: For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.
DCCD: For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during
turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.

 

Manual mode switch/DCCD control dial

In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock. Current settings of the control dial are displayed on the indicator in the meter.

DCCD: In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock.
DCCD: In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock.

 

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SI-Drive 2008+ STi Explained:

SI-Drive 2008+ STi Explained:

The 2008 Subaru Impreza WRX STI has a heritage of power and control. Previous models have been the foundations for countless racing victories and championships. The new WRX STI promises the same with it’s 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.

SI-Drive: he new WRX STI promises the same with it's 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.
SI-Drive: he new WRX STI promises the same with it’s 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.

Power and control incorporate enchanced technology. As suggested by new switchgear on the dashboard and center console and my markings within the instrument cluster’s center-mounted tachometer, a driver has some things to learn before wringing out the most from the car.

Today’s electronics now allow the driver to tinker with engine response characteristics, the manner in which All-Wheel-Drive system fights for traction, and the degree to which braking and engine management help maintain vehicle stability. These capabilities are made possible by standard Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC), Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), and Subaru Intelligent Drive (SI-Drive).

AWD: The five types of Subaru systems

AWD: The five types of Subaru systems

Back in 1972, Subaru introduced the Leone 4WD Station Wagon. It was the first fourwheel drive vehicle designed specifically for everyday driving, rather than for off-road or rugged use.The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful. It quietly set the standard for Subaru to become the global AWD leader of today.

AWD Genesis: The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful.
AWD Genesis: The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful.

 

Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive:

Subaru calls its system of mating a horizontally opposed (boxer) engine to various types of full-time AWD “Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive.” This system is based on the balance of both the powertrain and the straight, nearly-horizontal, flow of power to the wheels.The weight of the flat boxer engine and the transfer components lie very low in the chassis, providing a lower center of gravity, resulting in excellent traction and stability.

The Five Types of Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive:

Subaru currently uses five different types of Symmetrical AWD. Each is specific to the Subaru model and transmission.The five types are:

■ Continuous All-Wheel Drive
■ Active All-Wheel Drive
■ Variable Torque Distribution (VTD) All-Wheel Drive.
■ Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD) All-Wheel Drive
■ Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC) All-Wheel Drive

ABS 5.3 Antilock Brake System for Early Subaru Part 5:

ABS 5.3 Antilock Brake System for Early Subaru Part 5:

 

ABS 5.3 Antilock Brake System for Early Subaru Part 5: Beginning in approximately December of 1996, a new antilock braking system called ABS 5.3 was installed on Legacy vehicles equipped with ABS.
ABS 5.3 Antilock Brake System for Early Subaru Part 5:
Beginning in approximately December of 1996, a new antilock braking system called ABS 5.3 was installed on Legacy vehicles equipped with ABS.

 

Beginning in approximately December of 1996, a new antilock braking system called ABS 5.3 was installed on Legacy vehicles equipped with ABS. This system uses a Bosch hydraulic control unit and a Nippon electronic control unit. ABS 5.3 is a four channel control design which can independently control the front wheels and utilize select low control to control the rear wheels (a system which provides the same fluid pressure control for the two rear wheels if either wheel starts to lock up).

Although similar to other Subaru ABS systems, there have been enhancements to component operation and location. Diagnosis has also improved because of the ability of the 5.3 ABS system to communicate with the Select Monitor. The hydraulic control unit or HCU is located under the hood on the right side of the engine compartment. The size of the HCU has decreased by approximately a third from that of the ABS-2E system, used on previous model year vehicles.

The HCU controls brake fluid flow by utilizing eight solenoid valves. There is an inlet solenoid valve and an outlet solenoid valve for each wheel. Mechanically, the inlet solenoid valve is open during normal braking, and the outlet solenoid valve is closed. The HCU also contains a motor and pump assembly, which operates only while ABS is actively controlling the brake fluid flow–preventing a wheel lock.

Beginning in approximately December of 1996, a new antilock braking system called ABS 5.3 was installed on Legacy vehicles equipped with ABS.
ABS 5.3: Beginning in approximately December of 1996, a new antilock braking system called ABS 5.3 was installed on Legacy vehicles equipped with ABS.

Externally the HCU of the ABS 5.3 has a relay box attached. This allows troubleshooting of the valve and motor relay area to be kept separate from the troubleshooting of the solenoid valves and pump motor. There are four modes of operation for the ABS 5.3 system. They are normal, pressure-drop, pressure-hold and pressure-increase. When wheel lockup is sensed, Mode Two, Mode Three and Mode Four may be activated. They are described as follows:

Buy this now: 1989 Subaru XT6

Buy this now: 1989 Subaru XT6

A Subaru XT6.
Subaru XT6.

If you want to own a really cool and really rare piece of Subaru history you should take a look at this XT6:

I have a 1989 Subaru XT6 5 speed with full time all-wheel drive and low miles. It is a 2.7 liter flat six cylinder engine and functioning air ride suspension. I’ve had the car for two and a half years now and it looks completely different from when I bought it. I’ve spent more hours working on it than I would probably like to admit. It has a new water pump, new timing belts, new fuel pump, new radiator, new plugs, new tranny and rear diff fluid, and four new tires, new exhaust. Over this previous summer the whole car was sanded, cleaned up, dents removed and straightened the whole body. It has a fresh coat of factory Subaru red and it looks awesome, you need to see it in person to really appreciate it. Countless hours put into it. I really don’t want to sell this awesome car but it is a historic subaru that deserves to be kept clean and taken on the occasional cruise. I’d accept trade offers preferably a subaru or truck but shoot me an offer.

Subaru XT6 for sale.
Subaru XT6 for sale.

Craigstlist

Is this 1989 Subatu XT6 a good deal or something that should be skipped? It’s from Wisconsin so I would be weary of rust, but it looks pretty rust free to me. I would inspect underneath the car however to be sure. What does everyone else think? Comment below!