Category Archives: DCCD

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AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.
AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

AWD: The Impreza WRX STI uses Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), the most performance-directed type of Symmetrical AWD. A limited-slip, planetary gear-type center differential provides a performanceoriented 35:65 front/rear power split.

LSD Mechanical DCCD Advantage Explained:

LSD Mechanical DCCD Advantage Explained:

LSD: Advantages of mechanical LSD

The mechanical LSD mechanism is advantageous in that it has good response of the LSD differential limiting force to the engine driving force and has direct vehicle operational stability allowing the driver to easily grasp changes in the vehicle behavior. This post discusses these advantages in comparison with conventional DCCD system.

LSD Mechanical Advantage: Controlling coil current based on driving force estimated from detected information. Time lag existent between a change in engine driving force and generation of LSD differential limiting force.
LSD Mechanical Advantage: Controlling coil current based on driving
force estimated from detected information.

LSD Advantage: The LSD differential limiting force exactly follows changes in the engine driving force.
LSD Mechanical Advantage: The LSD differential limiting force exactly
follows changes in the engine driving force.

DCCD Subaru STi Explained

DCCD Subaru STi Explained:

The Driver’s Control Center Differential system is system that appropriately controls the differential limiting force of center differential LSD depending on running conditions of a vehicle. The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.

The system consists of a center differential of planetary gear type provided with LSD function, a steering angle sensor, a yaw rate sensor, a lateral G sensor, a DCCD control module and other components.

DCCD: The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.
DCCD: The DCCD system evolved provides controls that follow operations of the driver, while conventional DCCD system provides those based on conditions of the vehicle.

Hybrid LSD mechanism using conventional electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism added with torque-sensitive mechanical LSD mechanism allows approximate coincidence between the vehicle acceleration/deceleration and LSD clutch differential limiting timings, resulting in linear LSD characteristics acquired through driver’s accelerator operation. Thus, the driver can more freely control the vehicle by easily grasping behavior of the vehicle.

In addition, the steering angle sensor let the DCCD control module know the driver’s intension of turning. In combination with the yaw rate and lateral G sensors, it adjusts the electromagnetic clutch LSD differential limiting force based on the running path imaged by the driver and the actual behavior of the vehicle. Thus, cornering in better accordance with the driver’s image is enabled, preventing occurrence of understeer and oversteer.

LSD MECHANICAL DCCD ADVANTAGE EXPLAINED

For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.

 

DCCD: For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.
DCCD: For balancing between the vehicle turning performance and traction during
turning in a high order, the center differential driving torque is set to have distribution ratio 41:59.

 

Manual mode switch/DCCD control dial

In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock. Current settings of the control dial are displayed on the indicator in the meter.

DCCD: In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock.
DCCD: In manual mode, the DCCD control can be used to adjust the differential limiting force of the electromagnetic clutch LSD mechanism in the range from free to lock.

 

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SI-Drive 2008+ STi Explained:

SI-Drive 2008+ STi Explained:

The 2008 Subaru Impreza WRX STI has a heritage of power and control. Previous models have been the foundations for countless racing victories and championships. The new WRX STI promises the same with it’s 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.

SI-Drive: he new WRX STI promises the same with it's 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.
SI-Drive: he new WRX STI promises the same with it’s 305- horsepower, turbocharged, intercooled Boxer engine and a six-speed manual transmission.

Power and control incorporate enchanced technology. As suggested by new switchgear on the dashboard and center console and my markings within the instrument cluster’s center-mounted tachometer, a driver has some things to learn before wringing out the most from the car.

Today’s electronics now allow the driver to tinker with engine response characteristics, the manner in which All-Wheel-Drive system fights for traction, and the degree to which braking and engine management help maintain vehicle stability. These capabilities are made possible by standard Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC), Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD), and Subaru Intelligent Drive (SI-Drive).

AWD: The five types of Subaru systems

AWD: The five types of Subaru systems

Back in 1972, Subaru introduced the Leone 4WD Station Wagon. It was the first fourwheel drive vehicle designed specifically for everyday driving, rather than for off-road or rugged use.The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful. It quietly set the standard for Subaru to become the global AWD leader of today.

AWD Genesis: The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful.
AWD Genesis: The safety and driving performance aspects of the Leone 4WD proved popular and made the car successful.

 

Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive:

Subaru calls its system of mating a horizontally opposed (boxer) engine to various types of full-time AWD “Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive.” This system is based on the balance of both the powertrain and the straight, nearly-horizontal, flow of power to the wheels.The weight of the flat boxer engine and the transfer components lie very low in the chassis, providing a lower center of gravity, resulting in excellent traction and stability.

The Five Types of Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive:

Subaru currently uses five different types of Symmetrical AWD. Each is specific to the Subaru model and transmission.The five types are:

■ Continuous All-Wheel Drive
■ Active All-Wheel Drive
■ Variable Torque Distribution (VTD) All-Wheel Drive.
■ Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD) All-Wheel Drive
■ Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC) All-Wheel Drive

Transmission: STi 6-Speed basic swap info into a WRX

Front Differentials:
02-07 WRX: open
04 STi: “SureTrac” LSD
05-07 STi: “Helical” LSD

Transmission: Sti 6-Speed vs. WRX 5-speed
Transmission: Sti 6-Speed vs. WRX 5-speed

Rear Differentials: R160, R180
These were originally used in the Datsun 510, 610 and other IRS Datsuns. The “R” stands for Fuji Heavy Industries. The R180 was used in the front axle of Datsun 4×4 trucks (720, etc). The number represents the ring gear size in millimeters.

R160 – 52lbs. WRX rear differential. It has a viscous LSD which is no better than an open differential since the unit is so tiny in this differential.
02-05 have a 3.54 gear ratio
06-07 have a 3.70 gear ratio
R160’s on 2.2L Legacy/Impreza’s have a 3.9 gear ratio

R180 – 64lbs. STi rear differential. It has a mechanical clutch type LSD.
04-05 R180’s have a 3.90 gear ratio
06-07 R180’s have a 3.54 gear ratio

Center Differentials:
02-07 WRX: Viscous coupling type
02-05 has a 1.1:1 gear ratio
06-07 has a 1:1 gear ratio
04-07 STi: DCCD (Driver Controlled Center Differential)
04-05 has a 1:1 gear ratio
06-07 has a 1.1:1 gear ratio

Do I need different front axles?
02-early 04 WRXs have female axles and need to use stubs that go inside the transmission . Late 04-07 WRXs use male ended axles that slide inside the front differential so there is no need for stubs. For the female axles, you need axle stubs, circlips, and seals to reuse the WRX axles (check out the seal differences link for part numbers). You can use the stubs from your 5MT. For the male ended axles, they just slide right into place with the correct seals and circlips. 04 STi front axles will work too.

Engine Management For Subaru WRX/STi

 

Why do I need engine management?

 


Consider your stock engine management for just a moment. Your stock engine control unit (ECU) is a very complex piece of circuitry that calculates hundreds of variables every second. All of these variables rely on inputs within a + or – range. When you modify your vehicle, these values change. As long as the changes are within the values the ECU expects to receive, your engine runs fine. Once the values are exceeded, the ECU is programmed to compensate to return the values to normal levels.

A typical way of engine management is to use a Cobb Accessport.
A typical way of engine management is to use a Cobb Accessport.

This is a layman’s explanation of how your stock ECU can actually work against you when modifying your vehicle. This also explains why modifications can feel great once they are bolted on but the butt dyno results seem to fade over time. This is due to ECU compensation.

What is the first step in finding what engine management I need? Finding a tuner. The Tuner FAQ will help with the general rules of finding a good tuner. Remember, it’s always better to have a custom tune vs. a plug and play or “staged” map. Always defer to the tuner’s advice as to what to choose as ultimately he will be the one to provide custom support. Discuss your goals and budget and your tuner should set you on the right path. If you are a “plug and play” kind of person, review the options below and decide for yourself along with input from locals in your regional forum and the car parts review forum.

What will engine management do for me? Generally speaking, engine management optimizes several engine functions to create more horsepower and efficiency. The stock ECU is designed to ensure your car runs fine and monitors the engine’s output parameters. Utilizing an aftermarket engine management solution takes this to the next level.

2nd Generation Subaru Impreza WRX STi United Kingdom varients

Impreza WR1
Impreza WR1

A limited edition of 1000 Japanese MY04 WRX STI‘s with DCCD were exported to celebrate victory in the 2003 WRC drivers’ championship. 500 were sold in Europe, Australia and South Africa as the Petter Solberg edition; the other 500 were further modified by Prodrive and sold in the UK as the WR1. They had 316 bhp (236 kW) and 309.8 ft·lbf (420.0 N·m), an incredible 0-60 mph time of only 4.25 seconds and a top speed of 155 mph (249 km/h) (electronically limited). They were equipped with Prodrive WRX STI springs, Pirelli PZero Nero tires, mesh grilles, special Ice Blue metallic paint and Prodrive PFF7 Pewter wheels. The new ECU and exhaust were not EU-homologated, so they were fitted after registering the car. The retail price was £29,995.