Tag Archives: turbo

Cool Down WRX Turbo Procedure

Cool Down WRX Turbo Procedure:

It is not necessary to perform a cool down/idling procedure on Subaru WRX turbo models, as was recommended with past turbo models. “The current 2.0 liter turbo engine has a far greater cooling capacity and, coupled with technology advances, makes this practice no longer necessary. This explains why information about a cool down is not included in the Impreza Owner’s Manual.

Cool Down WRX Turbo Procedure: It is not necessary to perform a “cool down/idling” procedure on Subaru WRX turbo models, as was recommended with past turbo models.
Cool Down WRX Turbo Procedure: It is not necessary to perform a “cool down/idling” procedure on Subaru WRX turbo models, as was recommended with past turbo models.

The heat contained in the turbocharger begins to vaporize the coolant at the turbocharger after the engine is stopped. This hot vapor then enters the coolant reservoir tank, which is the highest point of the coolant system.

At the same time the vapor exits the turbocharger, coolant supplied from the right bank cylinder head flows into the turbo. This action reduces the turbocharger temperature. This process will continue until the vaporizing action in the turbocharger has stopped or cooled down.

Maintenance Inspections for Subaru:

Maintenance Inspections for Subaru:

Subaru vehicles are more reliable than ever before. To assure their continued reliability, a schedule of inspection and maintenance (I & M) services is prescribed by Subaru of America for every Subaru vehicle sold. A copy of this schedule can be found in the Warranty and Maintenance Booklet located in the vehicle glove compartment.

Maintenance Inspections for Subaru: Subaru vehicles are more reliable than ever before. To assure their continued reliability, a schedule of inspection and maintenance (I & M) services is prescribed by Subaru of America for every Subaru vehicle sold.
Maintenance Inspections for Subaru:
Subaru vehicles are more reliable than ever before. To assure their continued reliability, a schedule of inspection and maintenance (I & M) services is prescribed by Subaru of America for every Subaru vehicle sold.

Subaru vehicle maintenance inspections services are divided into recommended intervals beginning with three months or 3000 miles (whichever comes first). Each additional level in the maintenance schedule (7,500/15,000/ 30,000 miles) adds more maintenance and inspection steps to the process. The 15,000 (15 month) and 30,000 mile (30 month) services are ‘major’ services, and include the most comprehensive range of component checks, part replacements and adjustments.

If you are already familiar with Subaru vehicles, you may have developed a routine when performing a vehicle safety maintenance inspections. Following a set routine allows you to start at one end of the vehicle and end up at the other end, having performed all of the necessary safety inspection steps along the way.

Repetition of the safety inspection may also allow you to commit the steps to memory, but a checklist can be a helpful addition that leaves nothing to chance (or memory). Checking items off the checklist provides a written record that can be shared with the customer and retained for your service records as well.

Recommended steps in a Subaru Safety Maintenance Inspections  are also spelled out in the owner’s Warranty and Maintenance Booklet. Some of the steps overlap services performed during the scheduled maintenance program. It could be argued that any scheduled maintenance should always include a Safety Inspection. Most of the Safety Maintenance Inspection steps are based on common sense, but it’s surprising how frequently these simple suggestions are ignored.

Nice Price or Crack Pipe? 1987 Turbo GL-10 Wagon

Nice Price or Crack Pipe? 1987 Turbo GL-10 Wagon:

FOR SALE: A very rare 1987 Subaru GL-10 4WD TURBO Wagon w/5 Speed Manual & Digital Dashboard.

FOR SALE: A very rare 1987 Subaru GL-10 4WD TURBO Wagon w/5 Speed Manual & Digital Dashboard.
FOR SALE: A very rare 1987 Subaru GL-10 4WD TURBO Wagon w/5 Speed Manual & Digital Dashboard.

I only purchased this car about a month ago. It came from the Allentown PA area and had one original owner (me being the second). It needs some work and I do not have the time to fix it up before winter as I originally hoped. With another Subaru project car already in the garage, sadly this one must go. I am hoping to pass this on to another Subaru enthusiast who has the time to make it perfect again.

The car runs and drives great, shifts smooth and even has a little TURBO light on the dash when you give it some extra gas. All of the digital gauges, warning lights, power windows/mirrors, am/fm/tape player, and other electronics work perfectly. The AC blows cold and the HEAT is hot. The interior is clean and maybe a 7 or 8 out of 10… for its age. I noticed that the frame has had some previous rust repairs and will need some additional work around the frame rails.

The engine is clean and runs great, but pretty much leaks from everywhere. The front axle boots are busted and will need to be replaced (new axles are included in sale). I have the original owners manual and “added security” paperwork, the 1987 Subaru sales catalog, the original keys as well as some extras, and a Haynes Repair Manual. The car will be detailed with a full tank of gas at time of sale!

I am only asking $3800 or best offer. I have the title in hand! If interested in seeing the car or have an questions, please contact me by email. Thank you!

Fully loaded with every 80’s Subaru option including:
* 4WD
* 5-Speed Manual
* Turbo charged
* AM/FM Stereo w/Tape Deck
* Adjustable Steering Wheel
* Air conditioning
* Cloth Upholstery
* Cruise control
* Digital Clock
* Front Bucket Seats
* Interior Hood Release
* Interval Wipers
* Power Mirrors
* Power locks
* Power windows
* Rear Defroster
* Rear Window Wiper
* Steering Wheel Controls
* Sunroof
* Tachometer
* Tilt Steering Column
* Trip Odometer
* Vanity Mirror(s)

Who would rock this awesome old school Subaru?

  • Nice Price (100%, 1 Votes)
  • Crack Pipe (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 1

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1987 Turbo GL-10 Wagon for sale

Overboost and Underboost Subaru common causes:

Overboost and Underboost Subaru common causes:

The common causes for overboost or underboost: This is a basic guide on the possible causes and some solutions to those causes of a overboost or a underboost situation in a turbocharged subaru.

Overboost and Underboost Subaru common causes: This is the layout of the stock turbo subaru boost control system.
Overboost and Underboost Subaru common causes: Turbo Subarus: Common Overboost and Underboost issues with Turbo Subarus.

Overboost:

1.) Decat + High flow induction –  Cure: Reduction of the solenoid duty cycle or alteration of restrictor size will help return boost output to its normal level.

2.) Split, poor fitting, or disconnected pipes – Cure: Replace or refit pipes, the pipes that will cause this issue are between the wastegate actuator, solenoid, and the turbo. Including up to the restrictor on the return pipe of the 3 port solenoid.

3.) Manual Boost Controller – Electronic Boost Controller set too high – Cure: Don’t be so greedy and back the boost duty/adjuster off to a safe level.

4.) Restrictor Pill not fitted / size incorrect – Cure:  Ensure restrictor pill is fitted (3 port) if so on a 3 port reduce the restrictor size and on the 2 port increase the restrictor size to reduce the boost to a safe level.

5.) Clogged 3-port solenoid: It is possible that the flow of air through the 3-port solenoid could be restricted between the turbo outlet port and the wastegate actuator port if the solenoid is very dirty (usually oil vapor from the intake system), this allows the wastegate to remain clamped shut longer than it should be causing a potential overboost situation. Cure: Clean with carb or clutch/brake cleaner.

6.)Loss of solenoid funcation: Although this is not bverboost it shows itself with very simmilar symptoms, its an interesting scenario. It is possible for the solenoid to fail or even stick shut while under boost. This will result in a rapid reduction of boost pressure to wastegate pressure approx 0.5 BAR. So if you were running at full boost 1.0 BAR for example and the solenoid was to fail shut it would feel just like overboost as the wastegate rapidly opens due to the solenoid blocking off the spill from the wastegate. Cure: Either clean the solenoid with carb or clutch+brake cleaner or replace the solenoid.

Wastegate and Boost Creep FAQ

Wastegate and Boost Creep FAQ

What is Boost Creep?

Boost creep is a situation where your wastegate port is not large enough to allow the exhaust gas to bypass the turbo. What happens is the exhaust gas will choke the wastegate port preventing further gas flow through the port. Then, the exhaust gas has to take the path of least resistance which is through the turbine of the turbo. This will spool the turbo ‘uncontrolled’ beyond your normal controlled max boost level.

Wastegate and Boost Creep FAQ: A stock Subaru turbo with the internal wastegate and stock actuator.
Wastegate and Boost Creep FAQ: A stock Subaru turbo.

The turbo will be spooling past wastegate spring rate pressure even though the wastegate is fully open thus it is uncontrolled. The best way to check for boost creep is to connect the turbo outlet port directly to the wastegate actuator port and go for a drive. In 4th gear you should normally get a stable boost level of about 0.5 BAR, if you have boost creep the boost will hit 0.5 BAR and will continue to rise with rpm until you either back off or hit overboost fuel cut.

Boost creep should only be present on a turbo that has very little restriction. For example a fully de-catted and high flow induction. It’s been found that the fast spooling IHI VF35 is very prone to boost creep. The cure is to remove the turbo and enlarge the wastegate port. Then, fit a stronger actuator 0.75 BAR the reason for this is because you have made the wastegate port larger. The effective size of the wastegate plate acting against the exhaust gas flow is larger which allows the exhaust gas excert more force on the wastegate plate.

This in effect weakens the effectiveness of the actuator. Before the increase in size of your wastegate port the actuator would open at 0.5 BAR, after the increase the actuator would open earlier at 0.3–0.4 BAR. After these changes are made to the turbo either a boost controller or a remap (to adjust solenoid duty cycle) should be sought to control the boost to a safe level.

Boost control systems on a Turbo Subaru:

Boost control system on a Turbo Subaru:

This guide covers most  boost related issues including a short introduction on how your boost systems work. This information is based on the Classic Impreza’s, but will cover the newer WRX/STi cars to a certain extent.

Safe boost levels:

When modding your car without mapping (full de-cat and high flow induction etc) you increase the efficiency of your turbo which could result in engine damage due to lean running at high rpm / max boost. To prevent damage always try and keep your boost level as close to standard as possible until your car is mapped for the increase in boost pressure.

TLDR: Don’t screw with your boost levels until you get the car tuned by someone who knows what they are doing. Otherwise you’ll probably end up with a blown up Subaru.

Boost Issues:

Is the boost control system connected correctly:

Maintenance:Subaru Periodic Maintenance Part 2:

Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Vehicle Maintenance Services:

Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Vehicle Maintenance Services: Often the best value and best parts come from Subaru themselves and often aftermarket replacement parts will be of substandard quality.
Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Vehicle Maintenance Services: Often the best value and best parts come from Subaru themselves and often aftermarket replacement parts will be of substandard quality.

Fuel Filter and Fuel Lines:

There’s no easy way to check the inside of a fuel filter for dirt or other contamination buildup. That’s why a 30 month or 30,000 mile replacement interval is prescribed. If the customer happens to buy a tank-load of bad gasoline before reaching this interval, it will be necessary to replace the fuel filter ahead of time. There’s no way to clean the filter—replacement is the only option. Remove the battery negative cable before you begin work on the fuel filter. Remember gasoline is a very flammable substance.

The fuel filter is just one small part of the fuel system. The fuel system includes many sections of steel and rubber fuel line that run the length of the vehicle several times. The fuel pump, fuel tank, and fuel pressure regulator are just a few of the other parts of the fuel system. While you’re replacing the fuel filter, don’t forget to check the condition of the rest of the fuel system.

Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Vehicle Maintenance Services: Pictured is a Subaru STi fuel system. Making sure your filter is in good condition and is replaced regularly will prevent problems from occurring.
Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Vehicle Maintenance Services: Pictured is a Subaru STi fuel system. Making sure your filter is in good condition and is replaced regularly will prevent problems from occurring.

If any of the rubber hoses (especially the ones that were opened up to replace the filter) look damaged or frayed, they must be replaced before they can cause any further damage. Weak fuel hose clamps should be replaced, and the new ones must be properly positioned and tightened to specification.


Subaru 42072PA010 Fuel Filter

Oil Additives: What Subaru Says

Oil Additives: What Subaru Says

Subaru of America does not recommend the use of any engine oil additives in any Subaru engine crankcase. Subaru engines are designed to be lubricated with normal petroleum or synthetic-based engine oils in the viscosity and grade indicated in the Owner’s Manual for each specific engine and usage condition. Subaru has not tested the effectiveness or compatibility of any engine oil additives.

Oil Additive: Avoid adding any oil additives to your Subaru boxer engine.
Oil Additive: Avoid adding any oil additives to your Subaru boxer engine.

However, the use of such oil additives does not void warranty coverage. Usage of any additive is at the owner’s discretion. Since Subaru has not tested the compatibility or effectiveness of any such additives, should an engine failure occur that is determined to be caused by the incompatibility or performance of such an additive, the vehicle owner would be be referred to the additive manufacturer to request reimbursement of the cost of the repair.

If you are using oil additives to try to save a leaking headgasket it’s better to just suck it up and just either install new headgaskets yourself or have the work done by a trusted mechanic.

Either use Subaru’s OEM synthetic motor oil or use Rotella T6 motor oil. If your Subaru is still under warranty by Subaru it’s best to get your oil changed by a Subaru dealership and avoid introducing oil additives into your boxer engine. Even if it’s Subaru’s official stance that they won’t void warranties if oil additives are involved it doesn’t mean that they won’t if there is more evidence of engine “tampering”. Avoid anything that could potentially cause a dealership to refuse service to your car in the future.

Otherwise you might have a expensive repair bill if your Subaru boxer engine spins a bearing or has a ringland failure. Of course adding aftermarket parts like an exhaust or intake along with a tune will greatly increase the justification of a Subaru dealership to void a warranty more than adding oil additives.

Not adding oil additives can be another step in avoiding a void warranty from Subaru of America. On a final note remember that Subaru can scan your ECU for previous tunes even if you went back to a stock tune and will void a warranty for that.