Tag Archives: EJ25

Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru

Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru:

A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system. Today’s vehicles are producing very low emissions from the tailpipe, so it has become increasingly important to monitor and contain emissions from other vehicle sources.

Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru: A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system.
Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru: A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system.

A potentially large source of emissions is the vehicle’s fuel system. If not properly contained, vapors escaping from the fuel tank could produce a larger quantity of harmful emissions while the vehicle was standing still than what would be emitted via the tailpipe when the engine was running and the vehicle was driving down the road.

The Subaru OBD-II system monitors the evaporative emissions system by drawing the system to a negative pressure. If the system holds vacuum, it passes the test. If the system fails to hold vacuum for the prescribed period, it fails and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P04440 is stored in the ECM memory. The malfunction indicator light (MIL) also comes on in the dash to alert the driver to the problem.

The charts that follow were collected through the data link connector using the New Select Monitor (NSM), during the diagnosis of a DTC P0440 on a 1997 Subaru Legacy 2.5 liter. We’ll begin with a description of system operation under normal operating conditions.

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Knock Sensor diagnosis for Subaru

Knock Sensor diagnosis for Subaru:

This is a simple overview on diagnosing knock sensor issues with your Subaru Impreza/Forester/Legacy/Etc.

The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals.
The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals.

The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals. The electrical signal is sent to the ECM, which changes the ignition timing to reduce the engine knock or ping. For this system to work correctly, the knock sensor must first hear the engine ping. The driver of the vehicle may also hear a small engine ping. A delay of approximately 1-2 seconds is normal, depending on the fuel quality, engine load, air temp, etc. At this time, the ECM will retard the timing.

This function can be viewed on the Select Monitor RTRD mode. When the knock is eliminated, the timing is gradually advanced to the specified setting. If engine ping is heard again this process is repeated. This will continue until the knock sensor no longer hears the engine knock or ping.

Note: This is a normal operation of the knock sensor. Do not try to repair it.

The next page will discuss asking the right questions on diagnosing knock sensor failures.

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Engine noise when cold (Winter is coming)

Engine Noise When Cold:

Beginning with the 1997 model year, the 2.2 and 2.5 engines were made more fuel efficient, more powerful, and were given a flatter, more usable torque curve than in previous years. To achieve these objectives, it was necessary to make improvements and modifications to the Subaru engine lineup. The following are some of those improvements:

• Mechanical valve lash adjusters (reduces friction).
• Lightweight pistons (reduces inertia).
• Short skirt, Molybdenum coated pistons (reduces friction).
• Increased compression ratio (improved power output).
• Improved cylinder head design (improved cooling).
• Improved induction system (improved breathing).

Engine Noise when cold: As a result of these enhancements, some Subaru engines may exhibit some engine noise during the warm-up period after a cold startup.
Engine Noise when cold: As a result of these enhancements, some Subaru engines may exhibit some engine noise during the warm-up period after a cold startup.

As a result of these enhancements, some Subaru engines may exhibit some engine noise during the warm-up period after a cold startup. This engine noise is a consequence of the engine improvements and is not, in any way, an indication of any engine problem.

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Subaru Engine Block Piston Size Identifier:

Subaru Engine Block Piston Size Identifier:

The picture below of this paragraph shows the location of piston size and main journal size information on all Subaru engines. As the figure illustrates, it is possible to have more than one piston size in the same engine.

Subaru Engine Block Piston Size Identifier: The picture on the bottom shows the location of piston size and main journal size information on all Subaru engines. As the figure illustrates, it is possible to have more than one piston size in the same engine.
Subaru Engine Block Piston Size Identifier:
The picture on the bottom shows the location of piston size and main journal size information on all Subaru engines. As the figure illustrates, it is possible to have more than one piston size in the same engine.
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Valve Adjustment DOHC Engine Part 2

Valve Adjustment Tool and
Adjustment Procedures:

As we mentioned, it takes a special tool to work within the limited clearance area between the cylinder heads and the frame rails. The ST 498187 is a three part tool. One part wraps around the cam lobes, a second touches the outer edges of two shim buckets, and a third eccentric bolt exerts the necessary pressure to push a pair of shim buckets away from the cam lobe to make shim removal and replacement possible.

The tool installed in the three steps:

• Wrap the first half of the tool (part A) around the lobes.
• Attach the second half (part B) to part A by sliding its pins through the slotted holes in part A.
• Install the eccentric bolt (part C) into the hole in part A.

Valve Adjustment Tool and Adjustment Procedures: As we mentioned, it takes a special tool to work within the limited clearance area between the cylinder heads and the frame rails.
Valve Adjustment Tool and Adjustment Procedures: As we mentioned, it takes a special tool to work within the limited clearance area between the cylinder heads and the frame rails.

The eccentric bolt forces parts A and B away from one another. Because part A can’t move (it’s wedged against the cam lobes), the only thing that can move is part B. Part B moves by forcing the shim buckets downward, away from the camshaft.

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Valve Adjustment DOHC Engine

Valve Adjustment DOHC 2.5 Liter Engine:

The first versions of the 2.5 liter twin cam engines employed non-hydraulic valve actuation. Like the timing belt, the clearance between the engine valves and the shim and bucket valve actuators does not require inspection and/or adjustment until 105,000 miles have elapsed. However, various circumstances may require an adjustment before that milestone is reached.

 Valve Adjustment: Unlike some overhead cam engines that require you to rotate the cam until each cam lobe is facing 180 degrees away from the adjustment shim, Subaru has very specific procedures for adjusting four valves at a time (a pair of intakes and a pair of exhausts).
Valve Adjustment: Unlike some overhead cam engines that require you to rotate the cam until each cam lobe is facing 180 degrees away from the adjustment shim, Subaru has very specific procedures for adjusting four valves at a time (a pair of intakes and a pair of exhausts).

Clearance is tight and there is little room to work between the cylinder heads and the left and right frame rails. A special tool (ST 49818700) is available for depressing the valves and removing the adjusting shims. Without this tool, the job is impossible to accomplish with the engine in the car. Once again, we had the benefit of working on an engine that had already been removed from the car. Before you can adjust the valves, the engine must be cold. Consult the service manual to determine the parts that will need to be moved or removed to make some room to work.

Unlike some overhead cam engines that require you to rotate the cam until each cam lobe is facing 180 degrees away from the adjustment shim, Subaru has very specific procedures for adjusting four valves at a time (a pair of intakes and a pair of exhausts). The pairs of intakes and exhausts are never for the same cylinder, which makes things rather interesting. This system requires you to turn the crankshaft a total of four times to complete the adjustment procedure.

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Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Maintenance Part 4:

Maintenance: Subaru Periodic Maintenance Part 4:

Steering and Suspension:

Steering and suspension parts are a lot like the brake system components. Their proper operation is vitally important to the safety of the driver and his passengers, but it is very difficult to determine how long it will be before any of these components will require attention. That’s why an inspection of all steering and suspension components is required at 15 month/15,000 mile intervals. Changes to these systems may be too gradual for the driver to even notice, leaving it to you to ferret out and correct any wear or damage that has taken place.

Maintenance:Subaru Periodic Maintenance Part 4: Regular checks of the steering and suspension is important.
Maintenance:Subaru Periodic Maintenance Part 4: Regular checks of the steering and suspension is important.

We won’t cover all of the steering and suspension checks here. There’s too much variation between different Subaru models to do an adequate job. What you’re looking for is anything that reduces the original precision of the steering and suspension systems. Perhaps the steering has a little too much play in it or the shocks and struts don’t handle the bumps in the road as well as they did when new. Specific tests for the Subaru model you’re working on can be found in the service manual.

Check the power steering system for dampness or other signs of fluid leakage. The power steering pump reservoir is a good place to start. If the reservoir is low, the fluid has probably leaked out, as it has no place else to go. Approved fluids for the power steering system include Dexron II, IIE or III.


GENUINE OEM SUBARU ATF-HP P/S FLUID QUART BOTTLE

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Ignition Coil Testing “Waste spark ignition system”:

Ignition Coil Testing “Waste spark ignition system”:

All late model Subaru four cylinder engines employ a “waste spark” ignition coil system. Each time the ignition coil fires, it provides a spark to two cylinders at exactly the same time. Since only one of the two cylinders is on the compression stroke when the coil fires, the spark to the second cylinder (which is on the exhaust stroke) is “wasted. ”

Ignition Coil Testing "Waste spark ignition sytem": A subaru waste spark coil pack.
Ignition Coil Testing “Waste spark ignition sytem”: A subaru waste spark coil pack.

The ignition coil sits on top of the intake manifold and is divided into two halves. One half provides the spark to the number 1 and 2 cylinders, and the other half provides the spark to the number 3 and 4 cylinders. Instead of the familiar single secondary coil terminal, this coil has four secondary coil terminals.

Testing methods for this type of coil are slightly different from what you might be accustomed to as well. Using an accurate DMM, inspect the following items, and replace the ignition coil if it is found to be defective:

• Primary resistance

• Secondary resistance

Caution: If the resistance is extremely low, this indicates the presence of a short circuit.

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