Category Archives: Old School Subaru

Brake Noise Is It Normal?

Brake Noise Is It Normal?

One of the most common concerns that any vehicle owner perceives as a problem is brake noise when stopping the vehicle. The question pops up: “What is considered to be an ‘acceptable’ level of brake noise?”

Brake Noise Is It Normal? One of the most common concerns that any vehicle owner perceives as a problem is brake noise when stopping the vehicle.
Brake Noise Is It Normal? One of the most common concerns that any vehicle owner perceives as a problem is brake noise when stopping the vehicle.

The disc brake systems used on vehicles today are designed and developed to meet many different, but very strict requirements. This must be accomplished while providing an optimum level of performance under a wide range of vehicle and environmental operating conditions.
The brake pads selected must be a balanced choice. There is a fine line between a quiet brake pad and one that will provide optimum performance under extreme braking conditions. Consequently, when a change is made in the brake pad formulation (whether it is meant to provide longer pad life, shorter stopping distances, noise reduction or a change in pedal effort), a trade-off must be made in one area or another.

An example of pad formulation change would be the industry’s switch from asbestos to semi-metallic brake linings.

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Clutch Pedal Sticking Subaru

Clutch Pedal Sticking Subaru:

If you encounter a clutch pedal not returning completely after being engaged, or if there is a spongy or light clutch pedal feel while shifting, the following repair method should be followed.

Clutch Pedal Sticking Subaru: This condition may affect certain manual transmission vehicles with a hydraulic clutch system under certain weather conditions.
Clutch Pedal Sticking Subaru: This condition may affect certain manual transmission vehicles with a hydraulic clutch system under certain weather conditions.

This condition may affect certain manual transmission vehicles with a hydraulic clutch system under certain weather conditions.The affected manual transmission Subaru models are as follows:

1995-2002 Legacy
1997-2007 2.5L Impreza
1998-2003 Forester

To correct this condition you must replace the parts in the chart that match your vehicle using the following procedures:

Replacement Clutch Parts:

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Battery Charging Subaru:

Battery Charging Subaru:

Batteries low in voltage (below 11.6 volts) need to be specially charged. A battery at this voltage is heavily sulfated and needs either a very long, slow charge, or a very high initial charge voltage.

Battery Charging Subaru: Batteries low in voltage (below 11.6 volts) need to be specially charged. A battery at this voltage is heavily sulfated and needs either a very long, slow charge, or a very high initial charge voltage.
Battery Charging Subaru: Batteries low in voltage (below 11.6 volts) need to be specially charged. A battery at this voltage is heavily sulfated and needs either a very long, slow charge, or a very high initial charge voltage.

The battery should be left on the battery charger for at least two days. Since the acid in the battery will mostly be stratified, it needs sufficient overcharge to mix. Even after a two day charge, the battery still may only come to 60-80 percent of capacity and may need to be cycled to come to full charge. If possible, once the battery is fully charged by this method, it’s advisable to finish with a constant 1 amp for an additional 24 hours.

A battery that is below 11.6 volts can also be hydrated. This means there is lead sulfate in the separator that will form lead shorts once the battery charges. Because of these shorts, the battery may self discharge once the battery has been recharged.

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Emission Testing State Subaru

 Emission Testing Subaru:

Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer, nor should a state I/M program inspector or its contractors install the FWD fuse in the engine compartment. Attempting to do so will result in uncontrolled vehicle movement and may cause an accident or injuries to persons nearby.

State Emission Testing Subaru: Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer
State Emission Testing Subaru: Emission testing of a Full-Time 4WD or all-wheel-drive vehicle must never be performed on a single two-wheel dynamometer.

Resultant vehicle damage due to improper testing is not covered under the SUBARU Limited Warranty and is the responsibility of the state I/M Program or its contractors or licensees.

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to implement programs to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. Certain states are required to adopt either a “basic” or “enhanced” vehicle Inspection/Maintenance (l/M) Program, depending on the severity of their air pollution problem.

The ‘enhanced’ I/M emission testing simulates actual driving conditions on a dynamometer and permits more accurate measurement of tailpipe emissions than the ‘basic’ I/M test, which measures emissions only during engine operating conditions at idle and 2500 RPM. The ‘enhanced’ l/M test also includes a pressure check to identify evaporative emissions leaks in the fuel system.

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Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru

Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru:

A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system. Today’s vehicles are producing very low emissions from the tailpipe, so it has become increasingly important to monitor and contain emissions from other vehicle sources.

Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru: A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system.
Evaporative Emissions Testing Subaru: A major component of the Subaru OBD-II system is the system’s ability to monitor the evaporative emissions system.

A potentially large source of emissions is the vehicle’s fuel system. If not properly contained, vapors escaping from the fuel tank could produce a larger quantity of harmful emissions while the vehicle was standing still than what would be emitted via the tailpipe when the engine was running and the vehicle was driving down the road.

The Subaru OBD-II system monitors the evaporative emissions system by drawing the system to a negative pressure. If the system holds vacuum, it passes the test. If the system fails to hold vacuum for the prescribed period, it fails and a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P04440 is stored in the ECM memory. The malfunction indicator light (MIL) also comes on in the dash to alert the driver to the problem.

The charts that follow were collected through the data link connector using the New Select Monitor (NSM), during the diagnosis of a DTC P0440 on a 1997 Subaru Legacy 2.5 liter. We’ll begin with a description of system operation under normal operating conditions.

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Knock Sensor diagnosis for Subaru

Knock Sensor diagnosis for Subaru:

This is a simple overview on diagnosing knock sensor issues with your Subaru Impreza/Forester/Legacy/Etc.

The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals.
The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals.

The knock sensor is designed to sense knocking signals from each cylinder. The knock sensor is a piezo-electric type element which converts knocking vibrations into electrical signals. The electrical signal is sent to the ECM, which changes the ignition timing to reduce the engine knock or ping. For this system to work correctly, the knock sensor must first hear the engine ping. The driver of the vehicle may also hear a small engine ping. A delay of approximately 1-2 seconds is normal, depending on the fuel quality, engine load, air temp, etc. At this time, the ECM will retard the timing.

This function can be viewed on the Select Monitor RTRD mode. When the knock is eliminated, the timing is gradually advanced to the specified setting. If engine ping is heard again this process is repeated. This will continue until the knock sensor no longer hears the engine knock or ping.

Note: This is a normal operation of the knock sensor. Do not try to repair it.

The next page will discuss asking the right questions on diagnosing knock sensor failures.

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Subaru Brat Advertising Pictures

Subaru Brat Advertising Pictures:

I really love the advertising that Subaru did with the brat.

Subaru Brat: We're changing the face of 4 wheel drive.
Subaru Brat: We’re changing the face of 4 wheel drive.

What I would give to find a mint Subaru Brat. That winch and bumper bar are really cool. I wonder if you could even find one of those these days.

Subaru Brat: If you tried cruising on this you would be pulled over immediately.
Subaru Brat: If you tried cruising on this you would be pulled over immediately.

If you tried cruising on this you would be pulled over immediately.

Subaru Brat: Fun on Wheels.
Subaru Brat: Fun on Wheels.

Later that day this Subaru Brat rusted through completely. The jump seats in the back are awesome to sit in. If you never have I suggest that you do.

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Legacy World Speed Records

Legacy World Speed Records:

Prior to launching the 1990 Legacy, Subaru drew attention to the car’s capabilities and durability by attempting to set world speed records with the Legacy. In an effort involving three Legacy RS Turbo Sedans, Subaru established a new 100,000 kilometer (62,137 miles) world speed record as well as 13 international records. Some of these records still stand today.

Legacy World Speed Records: For the 1990 model year, Subaru was launching the Legacy, a front-wheel drive model with optional 4-wheel drive. It was larger than previous Subaru models and had a 2.0-liter, 16-valve, turbocharged engine.
Legacy World Speed Records: For the 1990 model year, Subaru was launching the Legacy, a front-wheel drive model with optional 4-wheel drive. It was larger than previous Subaru models and had a 2.0-liter, 16-valve, turbocharged engine.

For the 1990 model year, Subaru was launching the Legacy, a front-wheel drive model with optional 4-wheel drive. It was larger than previous Subaru models and had a 2.0-liter, 16-valve, turbocharged engine. Since the car represented a new segment for Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (FHI), it wanted to demonstrate the vehicle’s performance, reliability, and durability. Thus began the quest for the 100,000 kilometer (62,137 miles) world record. That represents the distance typically covered during five years of hard driving.

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